Research

Find out about our current and previous research projects related to deaf people and New Zealand Sign Language.

Current research projects

Signs of development—Sociolinguistic variation and change in NZSL in times of status change and globalisation

Lexicography - making dictionaries of NZSL

Previous projects

Name signs in classrooms—teachers' and students' perspectives

Signs of globalisation

Learn NZSL—an e-learning website for NZSL beginners

Our place—geographical signs

Assessing the ethnolinguistic vitality of NZSL

Christchurch earthquake Deaf history

Sociolinguistic variation in NZSL

Deaf children in mainstream classrooms

Research theses

Collins-Ahlgren, Marianne. 1989. Aspects of New Zealand Sign Language. PhD thesis.

Sameshima, Shizue. 1999. Deaf Students in Mainstream Universities and Polytechnics : Deaf Student Perspectives. MA Thesis

Dugdale, Patricia. 2000. Being Deaf in New Zealand : a Case Study of the Wellington Deaf Community. PhD Thesis

Smith, Eileen. 2003. Deaf Ways: Literacy Teaching Strategies of Deaf Teachers in New Zealand. MA Thesis

Smiler, Kirsten. 2004. Māori Deaf : Perceptions of Cultural and Linguistic Identity of Māori Members of the New Zealand Deaf Community. MA Thesis

Bathard, Hayley. 2014. Intricate Identities: Cochlear Implant Users Negotiating Lives Between d/Deaf and Hearing Worlds. MA Thesis

Smiler, Kirsten. 2014. Ka Puāwai Ngā Kōhungahunga Turi : a Study of the Nature and Impacts of Early Intervention for Māori Deaf Children and Their Whānau. PhD Thesis

Rollason Ashleigh. 2015. The Teaching of New Zealand Sign Language as an Additional Language in Mainstream New Zealand Primary Schools. MA Thesis (U of Auckland)

Siu, Wai Yan Rebecca. 2016. Sociolinguistic Variation in Hong Kong Sign Language. PhD Thesis

Vale, Mireille. 2017. Folk Definitions as a Model for Sign Language Dictionary Definitions : A User-Focused Study of the Online Dictionary of New Zealand Sign Language. PhD Thesis

Iseli, Jacqueline. 2018. Deaf Ni-Vanuatu and Their Signs: A Sociolinguistic Study. MA Thesis