Mō mātou | About us

Nau mai, haere mai, tauti mai!

Tēnei au ka tū i te roro o tōku whare o Te Tumu Herenga Waka, ka titiro whakawaho ki te ao e rāhiri mai rā.

We are proud of our rich history and the impact that Māori at Te Herenga Waka—Victoria University of Wellington are having on the learning, teaching, research, and engagement activities at the University and beyond.

At 2,147 Māori students in 2019, our tauira continue to grow in number and diversify in their degree pathways. With over 250 Māori academic and professional staff these numbers are also increasing, and their contribution is being felt within teaching and research programmes across the University, Wellington, and the world. In 2019 the University facilitated the awarding of over $1,000,000 via more than 300 scholarships and grants to Māori students.

Our history

Te Herenga Waka Marae was the first marae to be established on a university campus. Read more about our marae history.

Our structure

Māori interest are represented across the University at all levels.

  • The governing body of the University is the University Council which includes two Māori representatives. The Council includes six committees including Te Aka Matua—Māori Advisory Committee plus the Academic Board. Toihuarewa is a subcommittee of Academic Board.
  • The Deputy-Vice Chancellor (Māori) and Assistant Vice-Chancellor Mātauranga Māori provide strategic leadership across the University.
  • Te Kawa a Māui—The School of Māori Studies specialises in teaching and research about Māori and Indigenous worlds and Te Kura Māori is the unit within the Wellington Faculty of Education devoted to Māori education.
  • Te Whānau o Te Herenga Waka is represented across the University through numerous associations, including; student groups, such as Ngāi Tauira (Māori Student’s Association), Ngā Rangahautira (Māori Law Students' Association), Ngā Tāura Ūmanga (Māori Commerce Students' Association), Te Hōhaieti o te Reo Māori (Māori Language Society), MAI Ki Pōneke (postgraduate students’ network); and Te Hauhiku (the association of Māori professional staff).

Our staff and students also contribute to the University and broader society through many professional and academic external engagement and service leadership roles.

Ngā mihi, nā

Professor Rawinia Higgins

Tumu Ahurei / Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Māori)