Showing courses for the subject Strategic Studies

Showing results 1 - 61 of 61 results

  • INTP416 (2018): The Politics of Statebuilding

    30 points. Course not offered in 2018.

    This course examines contemporary state-building missions, such as those to Solomon Islands, East Timor, Bosnia and Kosovo, but is particularly concerned with how foreign-orchestrated interventions interact with local state formation processes. It looks at how modern states, particularly those in the South Pacific and Southeast Asia, are shaped by underlying conditions, including ethno-linguistic diversity and/or conflict, and the presence of powerful military forces.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/intp/416/2018

  • INTP417 (2020): Comparative Regional Integration

    30 points. Course not offered in 2020.

    Is the structure of political economy in the contemporary world national, regional or global? This course investigates this question by addressing one of the central issues of comparative politics and international relations: the politics of creating and extending market relations. 70% internal assessment, 30% examination.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/intp/417/2020

  • INTP427 (2020): Special Topic: War and its Aftermath

    30 points. Trimester 1. Coordinator: Kate Schick.

    This course examines war and its aftermath in global politics. It explores different forms of conflict in the international system as well as the changing nature of political violence. It then explores the ways in which actors in the international system have attempted to mitigate conflict through conflict resolution and to deal with its fallout in criminal tribunals and truth commissions after war. Alongside analysis of the tangible dimensions of war, students will also consider the unseen dimensions, exploring motivations for political violence as well as the psychological effects of such violence on communities. The course employs a multidisciplinary perspective, drawing on readings from political studies, security studies, history, psychology, and social theory.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/intp/427/2020

  • INTP429 (2020): Analysis of International Cooperation

    30 points. Trimester 2. Coordinator: Matthew Castle.

    This course explores when and why states cooperate with each other, how they structure their cooperation (through informal arrangements, laws, and organisations), and what role(s) various domestic and international actors play in these processes. We ground ourselves in the early literature on international cooperation, but focus chiefly on more recent work. Because the recent literature relies heavily on quantitative analysis, students will learn elements of regression analysis and will be able to interpret scholarly findings that employ these methods. We will explore various issue-areas: economics, the environment, social and cultural matters, human rights, and development.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/intp/429/2020

  • INTP429 (2019): Analysis of International Cooperation

    30 points. Trimester 2. Coordinator: Matthew Castle.

    This course explores when and why states cooperate with each other, how they structure their cooperation (through informal arrangements, laws, and organisations), and what role(s) various domestic and international actors play in these processes. We ground ourselves in the early literature on international cooperation, but focus chiefly on more recent work. Because the recent literature relies heavily on quantitative analysis, students will learn elements of regression analysis and will be able to interpret scholarly findings that employ these methods. We will explore various issue-areas: economics, the environment, social and cultural matters, human rights, and development.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/intp/429/2019

  • INTP430 (2017): The Politics of International Migration

    30 points. Course not offered in 2017.

    This course explores how international migration - voluntary and involuntary, legal and illegal - is reshaping national and international politics. International migration will be examined for its effects on international security, human security, electoral politics, and multicultural politics. Attempts at the national, regional, and international level to manage international migration, especially refugee and illegal migrant flows, will also be studied.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/intp/430/2017

  • INTP441 (2019): International Political Economy

    30 points. Trimester 1. Coordinator: Ben Thirkell-White.

    This course covers the main theoretical perspectives and issue areas involved in studying international political economy (IPE) and supports student-led research into a more specific topic in IPE. The course concentrates on the political factors that shape international economic processes and explores some social consequences of the development of capitalism.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/intp/441/2019

  • INTP441 (2020): International Political Economy

    30 points. Trimester 2. Coordinator: Ben Thirkell-White.

    This course covers the main theoretical perspectives and issue areas involved in studying international political economy (IPE) and supports student-led research into a more specific topic in IPE. The course concentrates on the political factors that shape international economic processes and explores some social consequences of the development of capitalism.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/intp/441/2020

  • INTP442 (2020): Asian Security

    30 points. Course not offered in 2020.

    This course introduces theoretical approaches to the study of conflict and regional order and applies them to the contemporary Asia-Pacific region. Specific topics covered may include great power rivalry in Asia; real and potential inter-state and intra-state conflicts; a range of so-called 'non-traditional' and 'human security' challenges; and the role of regional institutions such as ASEAN, the ARF, APEC and the East Asian Summit. 100% internal assessment.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/intp/442/2020

  • INTP444 (2020): China and the World

    30 points. Trimester 1. Coordinator: Xiaoming Huang.

    This course examines the rise of China in the broad IR literature, exploring how and why nations rise and fall; the historical pattern of China's rise; the political economic character of the rising China; how the rise of China affects the geopolitical structure, international economic order, international society and global governance. This course is about international political change and the role of China in this. The rise of China provides an excellent setting in which all related issues, problems and theories on international political change can be effectively looked at and investigated.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/intp/444/2020

  • INTP444 (2019): China and the World

    30 points. Trimester 1. Coordinator: Xiaoming Huang.

    The rise of China has a profound impact on world politics, economy and the international system, and how we think, debate and understand international relations today. This course examines the problem of the rise of China in the broad IR literature, debating on how and why nations rise and fall, how the world responds to the rise of a new power, and what effects power restructuring creates on the international system. Taking China's rise as a critical case, the course helps students to develop an understanding of some fundamental issues in the study of international relations.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/intp/444/2019

  • INTP445 (2020): Global Civil Society

    30 points. Course not offered in 2020.

    This course explores the relationship of civil society (including NGOs and social movements) to aspects of development both within countries and at the global level. It considers contrasting theoretical views, examines case studies, and stresses the necessity of incorporating political considerations into analysis and action.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/intp/445/2020

  • INTP448 (2020): Identity and World Politics

    30 points. Trimester 1. Coordinator: Alexander Bukh.

    The main purpose of this course is to explore the role of national identity in international relations. It will introduce concepts, theories and empirical research on the role of collective identities in shaping states' policies. The first part of the course will be devoted to surveying different concepts of identity and theories of identity in shaping states’ policies via case studies that include China-Japan relations, Russia's relations with the West, US foreign policy and the Arab-Israeli conflict.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/intp/448/2020

  • INTP448 (2019): Identity and World Politics

    30 points. Trimester 2. Coordinator: Patrick Flamm.

    The main purpose of this course is to explore the role of national identity in international relations. It will introduce concepts, theories and empirical research on the role of collective identities in shaping states' policies. The first part of the course will be devoted to surveying different concepts of identity and theories of identity in shaping states’ policies via case studies that include China-Japan relations, Russia's relations with the West, US foreign policy and the Arab-Israeli conflict.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/intp/448/2019

  • INTP451 (2018): Special Topic: Transnational Activism and Advocacy

    30 points. Course not offered in 2018.

    This course focuses on the role of transnational advocacy networks and social movements in world politics. In addition to taking a social scientist's perspective on how such networks and movements affect international relations, we will look at the strategic dilemmas involved in transnational activism from an embedded actor's perspective.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/intp/451/2018

  • INTP452 (2016): Special Topic: China Field Study

    30 points. Course not offered in 2016.

    This course is a study of Chinese politics with special emphasis on how government and politics function in China and China's international relations and includes a field trip to Beijing, China.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/intp/452/2016

  • INTP453 (2020): Research Methods in Political Science

    30 points. Course not offered in 2020.

    This course advances students' understanding of positivist and post-positivist approaches to the study of Political Science and International Relations, as well as providing practical experience in a range of research methods. Students will analyse the strengths and limitations of qualitative methods, such as process tracing, interviews and interpretative content analysis; quantitative methods such as statistical regression and coded content analysis; and research methods for critical theoretical inquiry, such as psycho-analytic analysis and genealogy. The course will also consider larger ethical questions raised by research design. Students will be exposed to examples of research in Political Science and International Relations that employ a range of research methods. This course also provides the opportunity to learn new research skills, ranging from a basic introduction to SPSS to the practise of interview techniques. The course's focus on research design will be particularly

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/intp/453/2020

  • POLS401 (2016): Some Aspects of Modern Social and Political Thought: Power, Freedom and Justice

    30 points. Course not offered in 2016.

    This course explores contemporary attempts to deal with the interrelated questions of power, freedom, and justice in modern society. Topics include the nature of power in general and the forms power takes in modern states; the nature of freedom and its forms, as well as their relation to the forms of power; and the possibility of a just social order under modern conditions. We will approach these themes through careful readings of theoretical and philosophical works by Weber, Berlin, Arendt, Foucault, Habermas, Rawls, and others.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/pols/401/2016

  • POLS402 (2020): Selected Topic in Political Theory: Collisions and Coexistence: The Politics of Encounter in Diverse and Unequal Societies

    30 points. Trimester 3. Coordinator: Emily Beausoleil.

    Pluralism is often said to constitute a basic ‘fact’ of contemporary politics, and contemporary political theory has increasingly shifted away from political goals of unity, purity and a common good to models that take social difference as both inescapable fact and normative ideal. This course examines how such a ‘politics of difference’ is variously conceived, and the practical challenges it entails. Drawing from major developments in critical democratic, multicultural, and postcolonial theory, we will explore both the possibilities and challenges of cross-cultural understanding, coalition and coexistence in diverse and unequal societies.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/pols/402/2020

  • POLS403 (2018): Political Leadership: Theory and Practice

    30 points. Course not offered in 2018.

    This course will focus on fundamental questions such as what political leadership is, and when and why it matters. Classical leadership theories are canvassed, normative questions about leadership addressed, and the relationship between individual leaders and the wider societal and historical forces they encounter feature as a dominant theme throughout the course. Different presidential and prime ministerial leadership theories will be contrasted, using contemporary examples, drawn mainly from the U.S. and New Zealand. The dark side of leadership will also traverse historical figures such as Hitler and Stalin. A particular aspect of this course will be to focus on the psychological aspects of leadership, especially the master skill of discernment underpinned by a leader's character. The course will also examine case study methodology to assist students to undertake a research paper into aspects of political leadership.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/pols/403/2018

  • POLS404 (2020): Media and Election Campaigns

    30 points. Course not offered in 2020.

    How do politicians and political parties plan and execute their election campaigns? What communication strategies do they employ to persuade voters? What influence do traditional and social media have on election campaigns and, in turn, on election outcomes? These questions will be studied with reference to contemporary and historical election campaigns across a range of countries. Topics will include: structural influences on the relationship between media and election campaigns, such as electoral and party systems; how candidates use the media to campaign; and the impact of new media technologies on evolving campaign strategies.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/pols/404/2020

  • POLS407 (2019): Who Votes, Who Governs? Rethinking Political Participation and Representation

    30 points. Trimester 2. Coordinator: Bryce Edwards.

    Some argue that we are in the midst of a crisis of democracy with a decreasing number of people involved in politics. Others claim that the democratic process is actually improving with more people becoming politically engaged. We study different types and levels of political participation across generations and social groups.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/pols/407/2019

  • POLS407 (2020): Who Votes, Who Governs? Rethinking Political Participation and Representation

    30 points. Trimester 2.

    Some argue that we are in the midst of a crisis of democracy with a decreasing number of people involved in politics. Others claim that the democratic process is actually improving with more people becoming politically engaged. We study different types and levels of political participation across generations and social groups.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/pols/407/2020

  • POLS414 (2019): Special Topic: Politics, State and Society in the Pacific Islands

    30 points. Trimester 1. Coordinator: Jon Fraenkel.

    This course examines the politics of the Pacific Island states, and New Zealand’s role in the Oceania region. The first part looks at country-specific issues, including the drivers of the coup cycle in Fiji and sovereignty debates in New Caledonia. The second part considers broader themes such as electoral reform, the political economy of trade and the management of natural resource extraction.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/pols/414/2019

  • POLS414 (2020): Special Topic: Politics, State and Society in the Pacific Islands

    30 points. Trimester 2. Coordinator: Jon Fraenkel.

    This course examines the politics of the Pacific Island states, and New Zealand’s role in the Oceania region. The first part looks at country-specific issues, including the drivers of the coup cycle in Fiji and sovereignty debates in New Caledonia. The second part considers broader themes such as electoral reform, the political economy of trade and the management of natural resource extraction.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/pols/414/2020

  • POLS416 (2019): Borders, Migrants and States

    30 points. Trimester 2. Coordinator: Ayca Arkilic.

    This course will investigate the causes and consequences of contemporary human mobility from a political perspective. Topics will include: different modes of contemporary transnational migration, including refugee flows, temporary foreign workers, and highly skilled migrants; the regulation of citizenship; challenges of migrant incorporation; Islam in the West; the securitisation of migration; and state-diaspora relations.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/pols/416/2019

  • POLS416 (2020): Borders, Migrants and States

    30 points. Trimester 1. Coordinator: Ayca Arkilic.

    This course will investigate the causes and consequences of contemporary human mobility from a political perspective. Topics will include: different modes of contemporary transnational migration, including refugee flows, temporary foreign workers, and highly skilled migrants; the regulation of citizenship; challenges of migrant incorporation; Islam in the West; the securitisation of migration; and state-diaspora relations.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/pols/416/2020

  • POLS418 (2019): Special Topic: Japan Field Study: Border Studies in Japan

    30 points. Trimester part year.

    This course is a comparative study of Japan’s borders and territorial issues. It includes participation in Border Studies Summer School at Japan’s Hokkaido University. The Summer School will take place between Victoria’s Trimesters 1 and 2.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/pols/418/2019

  • POLS419 (2016): Government and Politics in New Zealand

    30 points. Course not offered in 2016.

    This course focuses on the origins and shape of the contemporary state in Aotearoa New Zealand. We ask how events (for example war, economic crises, and reforming governments) and ideas have influenced the nature of the state and the public policy agenda, including both domestic and foreign policy. 100% internal assessment.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/pols/419/2016

  • POLS428 (2020): Directed Individual Study: Parliamentary Internship

    30 points. Trimester 1 + 2. Coordinator: Stephen Levine.

    This course provides a limited number of selected students with the opportunity of gaining insights into parliamentary processes, the roles and responsibilities of members of Parliament, the functions and activities of the research units, the conduct of select committees and the activities of parliamentary parties. Students who are accepted into this programme will have the opportunity to learn about the parliamentary process by working at Parliament during their honours year. Members of Parliament are not to be contacted about an internship under this programme without prior authorisation from the Course Coordinator.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/pols/428/2020

  • POLS428 (2019): Directed Individual Study: Parliamentary Internship

    30 points. Trimester 1 + 2. Coordinator: Stephen Levine.

    This course provides a limited number of selected students with the opportunity of gaining insights into parliamentary processes, the roles and responsibilities of members of Parliament, the functions and activities of the research units, the conduct of select committees and the activities of parliamentary parties. Students who are accepted into this programme will have the opportunity to learn about the parliamentary process by working at Parliament during their honours year. Members of Parliament are not to be contacted about an internship under this programme without prior authorisation from the Course Coordinator.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/pols/428/2019

  • POLS432 (2020): Political Ideas, Political Action

    30 points. Trimester 1 + 2.

    This course explores the ways in which political ideas and political action shape political outcomes in a variety of situations. The precise content varies year to year, driven by the interests of the students enrolled in the course but a significant part of the course usually explores issues of New Zealand politics.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/pols/432/2020

  • POLS432 (2019): Political Ideas, Political Action

    30 points. Trimester 1 + 2. Coordinator: Margaret Clark.

    This course explores the ways in which political ideas and political action shape political outcomes in a variety of situations. The precise content varies year to year, driven by the interests of the students enrolled in the course but a significant part of the course usually explores issues of New Zealand politics.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/pols/432/2019

  • POLS453 (2020): Research Methods in Political Science

    30 points. Course not offered in 2020.

    This course advances students' understanding of positivist and post-positivist approaches to the study of Political Science and International Relations, as well as providing practical experience in a range of research methods. Students will analyse the strengths and limitations of qualitative methods, such as process tracing, interviews and interpretative content analysis; quantitative methods such as statistical regression and coded content analysis; and research methods for critical theoretical inquiry, such as psycho-analytic analysis and genealogy. The course will also consider larger ethical questions raised by research design. Students will be exposed to examples of research in Political Science and International Relations that employ a range of research methods. This course also provides the opportunity to learn new research skills, ranging from a basic introduction to SPSS to the practise of interview techniques. The course's focus on research design will be particularly

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/pols/453/2020

  • POLS488 (2019): Approaches to Migration Studies

    30 points. Trimester 1. Coordinator: Kate McMillan.

    This course will introduce students to the study of migration from a range of disciplinary perspectives. Students will examine core issues, concepts, theories and debates in the analysis of migration and how key disciplines (international relations, politics, geography, anthropology law and psychology) contribute to our understanding of international migration's causes and consequences.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/pols/488/2019

  • POLS488 (2020): Approaches to Migration Studies

    30 points. Trimester 1. Coordinator: Kate McMillan.

    This course will introduce students to the study of migration from a range of disciplinary perspectives. Students will examine core issues, concepts, theories and debates in the analysis of migration and how key disciplines (international relations, politics, geography, anthropology law and psychology) contribute to our understanding of international migration's causes and consequences.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/pols/488/2020

  • STRA519 (2020): Research Essay

    30 points. Trimester 1,Trimester 1 + 2,Trimester 2,Trimester 2 + 3,Trimester 3,Trimester part year.

    A research paper on a topic of significance to the field of strategic and security studies. Trimester 3: Withdrawal with refund by 1/12/2017; withdrawal without refund by 26/01/2018, after which date the permission of the Associate Dean (Students) will be required to withdraw.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/stra/519/2020

  • STRA519 (2019): Research Essay

    30 points. Trimester 1,Trimester 1 + 2,Trimester 2,Trimester 2 + 3,Trimester 3.

    A research paper on a topic of significance to the field of strategic and security studies. Trimester 3: Withdrawal with refund by 1/12/2017; withdrawal without refund by 26/01/2018, after which date the permission of the Associate Dean (Students) will be required to withdraw.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/stra/519/2019

  • STRA526 (2019): Dissertation

    60 points. Trimester 1,Trimester 1 + 2,Trimester 2,Trimester 2 + 3,Trimester 3.

    The dissertation allows students to undertake a detailed examination of a strategic studies research topic as a piece of independent research with academic supervision. Trimester 3: Withdrawal with refund by 1/12/2017; withdrawal without refund by 26/01/2018, after which date the permission of the Associate Dean (Students) will be required to withdraw.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/stra/526/2019

  • STRA526 (2020): Dissertation

    60 points. Trimester 1,Trimester 1 + 2,Trimester 2,Trimester 2 + 3,Trimester 3.

    The dissertation allows students to undertake a detailed examination of a strategic studies research topic as a piece of independent research with academic supervision. Trimester 3: Withdrawal with refund by 1/12/2017; withdrawal without refund by 26/01/2018, after which date the permission of the Associate Dean (Students) will be required to withdraw.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/stra/526/2020

  • STRA527 (2020): Project

    30 points. Course not offered in 2020.

    This course provides an opportunity for students to examine the development of government policy and practice in an area relevant to strategic studies, or to participate in a larger project in the Centre for Strategic Studies. Students will be supervised by a member of academic staff.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/stra/527/2020

  • STRA531 (2020): Strategic Studies

    30 points. Trimester 1,Trimester block dates. Coordinator: Cathy Downes, Robert Ayson.

    This course covers strategic thinking from Clausewitz to the 21st century. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between force and international politics including the role of strategy in limiting international competition and attempts to restrain the use of force.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/stra/531/2020

  • STRA531 (2019): Strategic Studies

    30 points. Trimester 1,Trimester block dates. Coordinator: Robert Ayson, Cathy Downes.

    This course covers strategic thinking from Clausewitz to the 21st century. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between force and international politics including the role of strategy in limiting international competition and attempts to restrain the use of force.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/stra/531/2019

  • STRA532 (2020): Asia-Pacific Strategy and Security

    30 points. Course not offered in 2020.

    This course provides a comprehensive account of leading strategic and security issues in the Asia-Pacific region. Themes include strategic relations between the region's major powers, small state security in the South Pacific and the security role of Southeast Asian countries.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/stra/532/2020

  • STRA533 (2020): New Zealand Defence and Security Policy

    30 points. Trimester 2,Trimester block dates. Coordinator: David Capie.

    This course will investigate the evolution of New Zealand's recent defence policy, its relationship to New Zealand's overall interests in both the wider world and closer to home, and the place of defence in New Zealand's national security agenda.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/stra/533/2020

  • STRA533 (2019): New Zealand Defence and Security Policy

    30 points. Trimester 1 + 2. Coordinator: David Capie.

    This course will investigate the evolution of New Zealand's recent defence policy, its relationship to New Zealand's overall interests in both the wider world and closer to home, and the place of defence in New Zealand's national security agenda.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/stra/533/2019

  • STRA534 (2019): Special Topic: New Zealand Foreign and Security Policy

    30 points. Trimester 3. Coordinator: David Capie.

    This course explores New Zealand's foreign and security policy. Topics covered include NZ's approach to regional issues in Asia and the Pacific, trade, security and defence policy, multilateralism and the UN, key bilateral relationships and cultural and public diplomacy. There will be guest speakers from MFAT and other agencies.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/stra/534/2019

  • STRA534 (2020): Special Topic: New Zealand Foreign and Security Policy

    30 points. Trimester 3.

    This course explores New Zealand's foreign and security policy. Topics covered include NZ's approach to regional issues in Asia and the Pacific, trade, security and defence policy, multilateralism and the UN, key bilateral relationships and cultural and public diplomacy. There will be guest speakers from MFAT and other agencies.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/stra/534/2020

  • STRA535 (2019): Special Topic: Designing Strategy: Wargaming and Analytic Tradecraft

    30 points. Trimester 1. Coordinator: Van Jackson.

    This course introduces students to the strategist’s "toolkit"- qualitative approaches to designing strategy for high-stakes decisions, primarily in a national security context. It explains the uses and abuses of different forms of strategic analysis, debates in the field, and how policymakers and strategists approach the task of strategy development. The course involves significant student interaction through the construction and application of scenarios and wargames. Students will learn not just how, but when, to use different tools to inform strategic decisions, including matrix games, alternative futures analysis, blind-spot analysis, red-teaming, and net assessment, among others.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/stra/535/2019

  • STRA535 (2020): Special Topic: Designing Strategy: Wargaming and Analytic Tradecraft

    30 points. Trimester 1. Coordinator: Van Jackson.

    This course introduces students to the strategist’s "toolkit"- qualitative approaches to designing strategy for high-stakes decisions, primarily in a national security context. It explains the uses and abuses of different forms of strategic analysis, debates in the field, and how policymakers and strategists approach the task of strategy development. The course involves significant student interaction through the construction and application of scenarios and wargames. Students will learn not just how, but when, to use different tools to inform strategic decisions, including matrix games, alternative futures analysis, blind-spot analysis, red-teaming, and net assessment, among others.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/stra/535/2020

  • STRA536 (2019): Special Topic: Future of War

    30 points. Trimester 2. Coordinator: Cathy Downes.

    This course explores the changing features of war and warfare in the early decades of the 21st century. The course addresses questions such as: what new ways of war could evolve? Is war on the decline or transforming as the domains of cyberspace and space become weaponised? What are the geostrategic, societal, economic, and technological factors that could affect the future conduct of war in its many extant or emergent forms? The course concludes by addressing the ethical, legal, and international relations impacts of plausible developments.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/stra/536/2019

  • STRA536 (2020): Special Topic: Future of War

    30 points. Trimester 2. Coordinator: Cathy Downes.

    This course explores the changing features of war and warfare in the early decades of the 21st century. The course addresses questions such as: what new ways of war could evolve? Is war on the decline or transforming as the domains of cyberspace and space become weaponised? What are the geostrategic, societal, economic, and technological factors that could affect the future conduct of war in its many extant or emergent forms? The course concludes by addressing the ethical, legal, and international relations impacts of plausible developments.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/stra/536/2020

  • STRA537 (2020): Approved course of study

    30 points. Course not offered in 2020.

    A course of study in an approved area of strategic studies led by a member of the academic staff.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/stra/537/2020

  • STRA538 (2020): Strategic Asia

    30 points. Trimester 2,Trimester block dates. Coordinator: Manjeet Pardesi.

    The threat and use of force have come to figure prominently in Asian international politics. This course explores the rationale, concepts, and military doctrines pertaining to the role of force as an instrument of state policy in postwar Asia in general, and the post- Cold War period in particular.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/stra/538/2020

  • STRA538 (2019): Strategic Asia

    30 points. Trimester 2,Trimester block dates. Coordinator: Manjeet Pardesi.

    The threat and use of force have come to figure prominently in Asian international politics. This course explores the rationale, concepts, and military doctrines pertaining to the role of force as an instrument of state policy in postwar Asia in general, and the post- Cold War period in particular.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/stra/538/2019

  • STRA587 (2019): Special Topic: Command, Leadership, and Management

    30 points. Trimester block dates.

    The aim of this course is threefold. First is to ensure a robust understanding of the concept of command and its application in the context of NZDF. Second is to enhance understanding of theories of leadership and its practice. Third is to develop understanding of approaches to management, comparing defence & civilian practices.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/stra/587/2019

  • STRA587 (2020): Special Topic: Command, Leadership, and Management

    30 points. Trimester block dates.

    The aim of this course is threefold. First is to ensure a robust understanding of the concept of command and its application in the context of NZDF. Second is to enhance understanding of theories of leadership and its practice. Third is to develop understanding of approaches to management, comparing defence & civilian practices.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/stra/587/2020

  • STRA588 (2020): Special Topic: Operational Studies

    30 points. Trimester block dates.

    The aim of this module is to examine and evaluate the central issues, ideas and concepts that form the foundation for an understanding of the conduct of war in its various forms and in its different operating environments.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/stra/588/2020

  • STRA588 (2019): Special Topic: Operational Studies

    30 points. Trimester block dates.

    The aim of this module is to examine and evaluate the central issues, ideas and concepts that form the foundation for an understanding of the conduct of war in its various forms and in its different operating environments.

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/stra/588/2019

  • STRA595 (2019): Thesis

    90 points. Full Year.

    null

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/stra/595/2019

  • STRA595 (2020): Thesis

    90 points. Full Year.

    null

    https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/courses/stra/595/2020