New Zealand Oral History Conference

New Zealand Oral History Conference

New Zealand Oral History Conference

Stout Research Centre for New Zealand Studies and the 
National Oral History Association of New Zealand (NOHANZ)
Te Kete Kōrero-a-Waha o Te Motu 
Te Herenga Waka | Victoria University of Wellington

18 – 20 November 2022

Te Reo a Ngā Taputapu
Memory, Oral History and Material Culture

From taonga tūturu to inherited family possessions material culture plays a fundamental role in symbolizing our expressions of identity and transmitting memory across generations. The term material culture here is taken to include any objects made or modified by a human, from the smallest item of jewellery to large monuments or buildings, and the ways in which these objects are understood and/or given symbolic or other meanings in oral histories. In this conference we hope to explore two major themes. The first concerns the different roles that objects play in the oral histories of iwi, hapu, whānau, or national, family or individual oral history narratives; and the second focuses upon oral histories and material culture in the context of institutions, such as galleries, libraries, archives, and museums (sometimes referred to as the GLAM sector).  We therefore invite papers that describe and discuss the significance and meaning of objects expressed through oral histories recorded in a wide range of cultural or social contexts. Secondly, we hope the conference will also explore the ways in which oral histories are used in museum or gallery exhibitions constructed around material objects. For example, papers might address any of the following questions or topics:

  • What roles do inherited family objects play in contemporary life narratives/identities?
  • How are photographic records of the past interpreted in oral histories?
  • Can inherited objects generate counterfactual family histories?
  • Are there gender differences in terms of objects and remembering the past?
  • Do culturally significant objects have agency, in terms of collective cultural practices?
  • Can the symbolic meaning of an object change over time?
  • The relationship between oral history and objects in galleries, libraries, archives and museums.
  • What can oral histories about objects contribute to the new history curriculum?
  • The conference will also include presentations, not necessarily connected to the conference theme, on recent oral history projects.

From taonga tūturu to inherited family possessions material culture plays a fundamental role in symbolizing our expressions of identity and transmitting memory across generations. The term material culture here is taken to include any objects made or modified by a human, from the smallest item of jewellery to large monuments or buildings, and the ways in which these objects are understood and/or given symbolic or other meanings. In this conference we hope to explore two major themes. The first concerns the different roles that objects play in the oral histories of iwi, hapu, whanau, and national, family or individual oral history narratives; and the second focuses upon oral histories and material culture in the context of institutions, such as galleries, libraries, archives, and museums (sometimes referred to as the GLAM sector).

We therefore invite papers that describe and discuss the significance and meaning of objects expressed through oral histories recorded in a wide range of cultural or social contexts. Secondly, we hope the conference will also explore the ways in which oral histories are used in museum or gallery exhibitions constructed around material objects. For example, papers might address any of the following questions or topics:

  • What roles do inherited family objects play in contemporary life narratives/identities?
  • How are photographic records of the past interpreted in oral histories?
  • Can inherited objects generate counterfactual family histories?
  • Are there gender differences in terms of objects and remembering the past?
  • Do culturally significant objects have agency, in terms of collective cultural practices?
  • Can the symbolic meaning of an object change over time?
  • The relationship between oral history and objects in galleries, libraries, archives and museums.

The conference will also include presentations, not necessarily connected to the conference theme, on recent oral history projects.

You will be notified by mid-August whether your paper has been accepted. Please note: presenters must register for the conference, and your abstract will be used for the conference programme.

Programme

Download a copy of the Programme (PDF)

  • Friday 18 November
    Workshops and/or guided walk.
    Opening Lecture 5.00pm at the National Library Auditorium, Molesworth Street, Wellington.  This is open to the public.
    Followed by a welcome function.
  • Saturday 19 November
    Registration opens at 8.15am, Alan MacDiarmid Foyer (AM101), Kelburn Campus.
    Full day conference presentations.  Followed by NOHANZ Annual General Meeting.
  • Sunday 20 November
    Full day conference presentations.

If you are a member of the National Oral History Association or the Stout Research Centre the conference enrolment fee is reduced to reflect your membership. Membership for the National Oral History Association of NZ or the Stout Research Centre  = $50.00

If you wish to become a Member of NOHANZ, please go to: http://www.oralhistory.org.nz/index.php/membership/

If you wish to become a Friend of the Stout please go to: https://pay.victoria.ac.nz/STOUT/menu

Registration

To register for the conference:  https://pay.wgtn.ac.nz/Registration/booking

Note: if an error message appears please just select CONTINUE SHOPPING.

Early Bird rate closes on 30 October.

Early Bird Member                             $200.00
Early Bird Non Member                     $250.00
Early Bird Unwaged Member             $150.00
Early Bird Unwaged Non Member     $200.00 
Full rate Member                                $250.00 
Full rate Non Member                         $300.00 
Full rate Unwaged Member                $200.00
Full rate Unwaged Non Member        $250.00 
Flat rate for Single Day                      $140.00

INFORMATION UPDATE
June 2022

We hope you are all planning to come to the conference, and here are further details about the keynote speakers, submission of a paper proposal, registration, grants, and accommodation.  Please note there are two key dates:

1 August 2022 is the deadline for both online submission of conference papers to Stout-centre@vuw.ac.nz and emailing the applications for conference fee and travel grants (see separate application process under Conference Grants).

1 September 2022 is the date when the registration link will be available on the Stout Research Centre website. Participants will be able to register for the conference, and book accommodation at Cumberland House, through this link.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

Friday evening:  Professor Te Maire Tau (Ngāi Tahu) will speak on ‘Can we add to the work of Jan Vansina?’

Professor Tau is the Pou Whakarae of the Ngāi Tahu Centre at the University of Canterbury. He took up the Director position of the Ngāi Tahu Research Centre in 2011, having previously been a Senior Lecturer in History at the University. Te Maire belongs to Ngāi Tahu, the principal tribe of the South Island, and lives in Tuahiwi, the largest village of that tribe. Te Maire is the Ūpoko (Director) of Ngāi Tūāhuriri (the tribal group of the Tuahiwi region in Canterbury). During his years as an undergraduate and later as a postgraduate student at Canterbury, Te Maire helped iwi leaders with their land claim to the Waitangi Tribunal, with a particular emphasis on traditional food-gathering practices. As a specialist historian on oral traditions, tribal genealogies and indigenous knowledge systems, Te Maire was used as an expert witness and historian for the settlement of the Ngāi Tahu Claim - the largest settlement in its day between Māori and the Crown for lands wrongfully taken. Since then he has had a number of publications dealing with oral traditions and the relationship between indigenous knowledge systems and how they intersect with western science. Te Maire’s research interests include the philosophy of knowledge, oral traditions, myth, indigenous development and history.

Saturday: Professor Paula Hamilton will speak on ‘Touching the imagination: memories and material culture, memories as material culture’

Paula Hamilton has a distinguished career as a cultural historian in the fields of memory studies, public history and oral history both internationally and within Australia. She was a co-founder and director of the Australian Centre for Public History at University of Technology Sydney and is currently Adjunct Professor at both Macquarie University and UTS. In addition to her research and teaching career at UTS, Paula has worked in museums such as the Powerhouse in Sydney and the National Museum in Canberra as both a curator and a research fellow. She has been active in oral history associations both nationally and internationally: between 2015 and 2017 she was an elected Board member of the International Oral History Association Council. Her published work revolves around the relationship between history and memory in a wide range of contemporary contexts, and recent publications include: ‘Speak. Memory Issues in Oral and Public History’ in What is Public History Globally? the Past in the Present (2019); (with Kate Darian Smith) Migration, Memories and Heritage (2019); and ‘Intimate Strangers: multisensorial memories of working in the home’ in A Cultural History of Sound, Memory and the Senses (2017). She is currently writing the chapter on Museums and Memory for the forthcoming international volume Oxford Companion of History and Memory.

FRIDAY WORKSHOPS

The Friday workshop programme is under construction, and more information will be forthcoming.  At this stage we have three confirmed activities:

  • A guided walk around Chinatown (Lynette Shum)
  • ‘What an Archive wants/Looking after oral history’ (Valerie Love, Oral History Curator, Alexander Turnbull Library)
  • Recording oral history (Stephen Buckland and Zach Webber)

Please note that the Friday workshops will cost $25 each and will be paid for separately. Further details will be available in due course.

CONFERENCE GRANTS AVAILABLE

MINISTRY FOR CULTURE AND HERITAGE CONFERENCE FEE GRANTS

We are very grateful to The Ministry for Culture and Heritage for supporting the conference through the provision of ten conference fee grants of $200 each.

The application form will be posted on the Stout Research Centre and NOHANZ conference websites. Please download, complete and email the Conference Fee Grant application form directly to Debbie Levy at deborah.levy@vuw.ac.nz by 1 August 2022.

Conference Fee Grant Application (Word)

NOHANZ TRAVEL GRANTS

NOHANZ is also able to make available a small number of travel grants to a maximum of $400.00 each. Applicants will need to be a member of NOHANZ and will be asked to submit a budget as part of the application.

The application form will also be posted on the Stout Research Centre and NOHANZ conference websites. Please download, complete and email the NOHANZ Travel Grant application form directly to Anna.Green@vuw.ac.nzby 1 August 2022.

Travel Grant Application (Word)

JACK ILOTT ORAL HISTORY EDUCATION FUND

This Fund was set up through the generosity of philanthropist Jack Ilott ‘to promote standards in the use of oral history as a means of documenting New Zealand’s past and contemporary history’. Grants of up to $500 may be made.

See:  https://natlib.govt.nz/about-us/scholarships-and-awards/jack-ilott-fund

The application form may be found here:

https://natlib.govt.nz/files/oralhistory/Ilott-fund-application-form.pdf

ACCOMMODATION

Accommodation will be available at the university student hall of residence Cumberland House, on Willis Street. This will be a single room with shared bathroom facilities. For further information about Cumberland House, see: https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/accommodation/halls/profiles/cumberland

Please note this will mean a walk up a steep hill to the campus and conference venue, but we intend to organise a minibus transport up to the conference on Saturday and Sunday mornings. Details to be confirmed.

We can offer two accommodation options:

  • a booking for two nights (Friday and Saturday @ $184.00 includes GST) or
  • a booking for three nights (Thursday, Friday and Saturday @ $276.00 includes GST)

These rates include a continental breakfast.

If you wish to stay at Cumberland House, please book and pay in advance when you register for the conference on the Stout Research Centre website.

We are unable to accept applications for refunds after 8 November 2022 (unless in exceptional circumstances).

FURTHER INFORMATION

For further information please contact either:

Liz Ward:  e.m.ward@massey.ac.nz or Anna Green: anna.green@vuw.ac.nz

https://www.oralhistory.org.nz/index.php/conferences-pastpresent/
or
https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/stout-centre/about/events/new-zealand-oral-history-conference

Please note that due to any required Covid response, we may have to cancel this conference if necessary.  Therefore if you are travelling to Wellington please book refundable air fares.